Obama Administration: Big Change to Immigrant Detention Policy

The Obama Administration has announced that it will commence taking action on a new policy to address the crisis found within several immigrant detention centers across the United States. The new policy will allow for immigrant mothers and children held at these federal detention centers to be released on bond, after which they must appear in court to hear out their requests for asylum within the U.S.

Department of Homeland Security Secretary, Jeh Johnson, stated that the conclusion had been reached and that the Administration believes that substantial changes need to be made for the sake of families with children. Criticism over living conditions at these detention centers had been mounting for some time. Sec. Johnson also stated that continued detention for families after they have established eligibility for asylum, or any other relief under U.S. laws, would be inefficient and not the best way to make use of these resources.

Critics of this change in policy are citing the potential for increased security risks or flight risks, but the Department of Homeland Security has dealt with such criticism by pointing to the bond amounts and how they are set to discourage any such actions. DHS will attempt to ensure that they can interview families that are eligible to be released as soon as they can, so that they do not have to spend any more time in these facilities. The detention program is criticised for its subpar living conditions, especially for families with children, causing many families to suffer from depression and trauma following months of uncertainty. There have also been accusations of abuses occurring in many of the centers.

This new policy will make it easier for families currently detained or fearing detention to find a faster path toward asylum or avoid detainment altogether. There are tens of thousands of women and children held in centers across the country.

Immigration Law Approval in the US and Canada

Abogado Aly Immigration LawDoes immigration really help the economy? What kind of specific immigration law helps the economy? In Canada today, only about one third of the population believe that immigration is a hindrance rather than an opportunity. According to Jeffery Reitz, Canadians are convinced on the economic advantages of immigration. So much so that in areas of economic distress, Canada implements incentives for immigration to those areas. Even unemployed workers insist that immigration is beneficial.

In Canada, under the point system, there is a greater flow of skilled labor mostly from industrialized countries. When looking at the labor market, immigration represents a shift outward to the right of the labor supply curve which decreases the real wage rate. In Canada this should only affect the high-skilled labor market because they do not allow low-skilled labor into their country. Therefore, immigration of high-skilled labor into Canada should decrease the real wage rate for high skilled jobs like doctors and engineers. In turn, this decreases the wage inequality gap by reducing the wage rate for high end jobs while keeping the low end job wage rate constant. Canadian statistics show that for every 10% increase in the immigration population, real wage decreases by 4% and real wage for people with post graduate degrees is decrease by 7% . In the United States there is the opposite problem. Since most of the United States’ immigrants come in the form of low skilled labor, this reduces the wage rate in the unskilled labor market while keeping the skilled labor market relatively constant. This widens the inequality gap with regard to the real wage rate.

A study done by Stephen A. Camarota, a research director at the Center for Immigration Studies, states that for every 1% increase in the low-skilled immigration population comes a .8% decrease in native low-skilled wages . Borjas states that there is a 44% change in the wage gap between unskilled natives attributable to immigration, whereas there is only a 4.7% change in the wage gap between skilled natives attributable to immigration. Since the United States also allows high-skilled labor to enter the labor force, the wage rates in high-skilled labor fields are also reduced because of the simple increase in supply; however, since there is a much greater inflow of low-skilled immigrants willing to work for a lot less, the wage decrease becomes a lot lower for low-skilled jobs than high-skilled jobs thus increasing wealth inequality. This distinction between wealth equality is a major issue and is a main reason why so many Canadians approve of immigration whereas more and more Americans every year are disapproving immigration.